Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.658994
Title: Using poly(lactide) crystallization to probe nanostructure morphologies for biomedical applications
Author: Sun, Liang
ISNI:       0000 0004 5357 8121
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
Chapter 1 gives the introduction of the main concepts and techniques throughout this thesis. Chapter 2 describes the control over the dimensions of various poly(L-lactide)-b-poly(acrylic acid) cylindrical micelles based on crystallization-driven self-assembly. Such change of the dimensions was realized by tuning the compositions of the precursor diblock copolymers. We have also explored the window to access cylindrical micelles as well as the relationship between poly(L-lactide) core block and crystallinity of resultant cylindrical micelles. In Chapter 3, we have studied the stereocomplexation between the crystalline-coil poly(L-lactide)-b-poly(acrylic acid) and poly(D-lactide)-b-poly(acrylic acid) diblock copolymers in an aqueous system. We have also observed an unexpected morphological transition from homochiral cylindrical micelles to stereocomplex spherical micelles which was proposed to follow a “unimer-exchange” mechanism. Chapter 4 discusses the preparation of fluorescent dithiomaleimide and aminobromomaleimide labelled polymers and nanoparticles and compares their different fluorescent properties. The potential applications of these fluorescent materials as bioimaging contrast agents were also illustrated. In Chapter 5, we have copolymerized an allyl-functionalized cyclic carbonate monomer with L-lactide in order to use the ally groups as versatile handles to modify the core domain of the resultant cylindrical micelles. Benzyl mercaptan was chemically attached to the cores of these cylindrical micelles using photo-initiated thiolene radical reactions, illustrating their potential applications as delivery vehicles.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.658994  DOI: Not available
Keywords: QC Physics
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