Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.658550
Title: Exploring value logics and management control systems
Author: Klassen, Mark
Awarding Body: Lancaster University
Current Institution: Lancaster University
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
This thesis explores the congruent relationship between a firm's value logic and its management control systems. The value logic typology was introduced in the Strategic Management Journal by Stabell and Fjeldstad (1988). The typology builds on the work of J.D. Thompson (1967) and Michael Porter (1980,1985) and proposes that organizations align to three value configurations: Value Chains, Value Shops and Value Networks. Value Chains are industrial organizations characterized by the generic Value Chain model developed by Michael Porter (e.g. standardized manufactures, mining). Value Shops are configured as problem solvers (e.g. physicians, lawyers, consultants) and Value Networks are designed to facilitate exchanges on a network (e.g. Banks, Teicos, Internet Auctions). Stabell and Fjeldstad (1998) and other strategy researchers (Sheehan, Vaidyanathan and Kalagnanam 2005, Fjeldstad and Haanaes 2001) argue that the "new economy" is more aligned to the growth of Value Shops (e.g. McKinsey, Accenture) and Value Networks (e.g. Nokia, ebay) and justifies why the value logic typology is more relevant in today's world. The research in this thesis focuses on asking the basic question of whether management control systems differ in Value Chains, Value Shops and Value Networks. The research concludes that the value logic typology is useful and has potential to increase our knowledge in the strategy and management control systems contingent literature. The research in this thesis is exploratory in nature and uses both field interviews and a questionnaire survey as research methods. A breadth of management controls systems exist across all value logics. However, there appears to be differences in their use which are highlighted in the thesis. The thesis contributes by exploring the strategy and management control systems contingent research from a perspective (the value logics), previously not studied.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.658550  DOI: Not available
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