Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.657991
Title: Narratives of change in fathers who have completed an incredible years parent training programme
Author: Murphy, Sinead
Awarding Body: Lancaster University
Current Institution: Lancaster University
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
The literature review examines the impact of fatherhood on the identity of men from lower socio-economic backgrounds. Nob lit and Hare's (1988) meta-ethnography was employed in order to synthesise findings across fifteen studies. Three themes were identified: (1) "the biggest thing is (s)he came from me": Fatherhood activated an inter-generational identity; (2) "you don't know how good it feels to come together within yourself': Fatherhood enabled men to alter their life course; and (3) "I worry about being a failure": Fatherhood challenged men's own sense of masculinity. The strength of these findings, however, was limited by the overall quality of studies and other methodological issues. Implications for services working with fathers from backgrounds of socio-economic disadvantage are highlighted. The research paper explores narratives of change in fathers who have accessed the Incredible Years Parent Training Programme (IYPTP) developed by Webster-Stratton (1984). The study employed a qualitative methodology in order to obtain rich, detailed data on the experience of fatherhood, IYPTP, and positive change. Six participants who had completed IYPTP and found it useful were individually interviewed, and data was subject to narrative analysis. A 'shared narrative' was developed which comprised of five temporal themes: (1) "The whole landscape changed": Transition to a new fatherhood role; (2) "Stuck in a rut": The challenge(s) of parenting; (3) "A drop of the warm": Moving forward; (4) "It was an eye-opener": Journey through the parenting course; and (5) "A progressive process": Implementing change for the future. IYPTP was either a central factor that helped participants to move forward, or just one of many factors within a wider journey. The critical review documents the impact of dominant sociological narratives surrounding fatherhood on the research process, with regards to the development of the research question, data collection, analysis, and strengths and limitations of the study.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.657991  DOI: Not available
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