Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.657774
Title: The role of early attachment experiences and social rank in the affect regulation for adolescents who have been violent
Author: Millar, Victoria
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
The current research is of an exploratory nature and is concerned with gaining a better understanding regarding why young people are violent. The ability of lack of ability to regulate affect has been associated with violence. Attachment and social rank have been identified as systems associated with affect regulation (Sloman et al 2002). Therefore the possible role regarding attachment and social rank will be investigated in relation to affect regulation for young people who have been violent. Young people (age range 12-16 years old) who had been violent were interviewed. The interviews were recorded with a digital voice recorder and then transcribed. Grounded theory methodology was used to code the data and to identify emerging themes within the data. Findings presented the following core categories: attachment: affect; self; and violence. A primary category, processing, was identified as being central to producing a tentative model which demonstrated a relationship between the core categories. The tentative model identified the level to which young people have made sense or processed their early attachment experiences, their experiences with respect to affect regulation and their sense of self on both an individual and an interpersonal level. Further research is necessary to elucidate upon the tentative model found within the present research in terms of confirming the finding of Sloman et al (2002) that social rank is a system used to regulate affect when attachment systems have been insufficient in terms of regulating affect.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psych.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.657774  DOI: Not available
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