Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.657601
Title: 'Maybe I'm tired of being human, if human is what I am' : sentimental posthumanism in the work of Martin Amis.
Author: Wilson-Hughes, Oliver
ISNI:       0000 0004 5351 5139
Awarding Body: University of Reading
Current Institution: University of Reading
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
Martin Amis is one of the most prominent figures in contemporary British fiction, and his work has been developed during a period of huge social transition. Emerging at the end of the sixties, Amis's writing has adapted to tackle the establishment of the information era and the emergence of increasingly transnational cultures. In this thesis, I will attempt to examine how Amis's work reflects these changes, as he tries to reconcile an uncertain future with a past that seems increasingly distant from the modern world. Engaging with his changing critical reputation, I will locate his work within a theoretical framework that encompasses posthumanism and other conceptual areas. In particular, I will focus on Paul Giles's concept of sentimental posthumanism. Built upon the perceived marginalisation of the human and the potentially dehumanising effects of posthumanism, I use the term to refer to a discourse that attempts to reinstate the human essence within a posthuman society. The thesis will examine four different aspects of Amis's work in the framework of sentimental posthumanism, designating a chapter to each of these topics: America and the transatlantic exchange; the increasing importance of artifice and the loss of affect within society; the posthuman conception of corporeality; and morality and mortality in the posthuman context In my conclusion, these threads are pulled together to assess the extent to which Amis's recent work represents a continuation of, or departure from, his previous work
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.657601  DOI: Not available
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