Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.657507
Title: Self concept and attributions about other women in women with a history of childhood sexual abuse
Author: McAlpine, Susan Jane
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2007
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Abstract:
Objective: To investigate self concept and attributions about other women of women with a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) using an adapted version of the self-concept card sorting task (Linville, 1985, 1987). Method: A mixed design was used to compare three groups of women: women with a history of CSA, women experiencing depressed mood but without a history of CSA and a healthy non-clinical comparison group of hospital staff. A between-subjects design was used but correlational analyses were also conducted. Results: General self-concept was found to differ significantly between groups. Significant differences were also found between groups when considering the initial self concepts that came to mind for each woman (e.g. mother, wife, daughter). However, this difference ceased to be significant as further roles were discussed. Few significant differences were found between groups when comparing attributions about other women, although a priori analysis revealed that the healthy non-clinical comparison group made more positive attributions about mothers than the CSA group and fewer negative attributions about mothers than the depression group. Conclusion: To some extent the current findings support previous studies indicating women attempting to cope with the consequences of a history of CSA have a negative self concept. However there is evidence to suggest that certain self-aspects are protective or protected. Similarly there is some support for previous evidence of difficult relationships with mothers. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed and areas for future research suggested.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.657507  DOI: Not available
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