Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.657118
Title: An exploration of gender differences in the coping skills, attributions, expressed emotion, and mental health of caregivers of people with alcohol problems
Author: McNicholas, J. L.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
The current study aimed to examine the differences between male and female caregivers of people with alcohol problems in terms of their coping skills, attributions, expressed emotion, and mental wellbeing. Methods: The study recruited 35 female caregivers and 20 male caregivers of people with alcohol problems. Participants completed the Coping Questionnaire, the Family Attitude Scale (FAS), the Causal Dimensions Scale, and the General Health Quesionnaire-12. Results: The study found that female caregivers had significantly higher scores than males on the GHQ-12. Both males and females engaged predominantly in coping strategies that were related to poor mental health. Specific attributions made by male caregivers were associated with poor mental health and high expressed emotion. For females, tolerant-inactive coping was also associated with high expressed emotion. Conclusions: The results suggest that female caregivers of people with alcohol problems have poorer mental wellbeing than male caregivers. Both male and female caregivers report frequently using coping styles which are associated with poorer mental wellbeing and higher levels of expressed emotion. Even when the person with the alcohol problem is engaged with treatment services, caregivers warrant treatment and support in their own right to help them cope in a manner which is more beneficial to their own mental wellbeing. Interventions offered to caregivers should consider the impact of factors such as expressed emotion and attributions on the coping and mental health of the caregiver.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psych.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.657118  DOI: Not available
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