Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.656856
Title: The impact of risk management practice upon the implementation of recovery-oriented care in community mental health services
Author: Holley, Jessica-Rose
ISNI:       0000 0004 5349 7989
Awarding Body: St George's, University of London
Current Institution: St George's, University of London
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
This qualitative study aims to explore how risk management practice impacts upon the implementation of recovery-oriented care within community mental health services. Semi-structured interviews using vignettes were conducted with 8 mental health worker and service user dyads in order to explore understandings, perspectives and attitudes on how risk management practice impacts upon service users' recovery within the community. Data analysis took part in two phases. In the first phase, data were coded into categories using a framework and grounded analysis approach. 8 overarching categories emerged from the data. In the second phase, queries were run on the data in order to explore how: 1) RMP issues impacts upon perceived responsibility for recovery; 2) tensions in responsibility for recovery in the context of RMP impacts upon the mental health worker and service user relationship; 3) attitudes towards service users' exposure to risk impacts upon service users' opportunities for social inclusion; 4) mental health workers' own working environment impacts upon the way RMP was addressed within a ROC context. The findings suggest an absence of RMP in ROC policies result in mental health workers describing how they would ideally use a positive risk taking approach to support ROC, this over-rides considerations of managing risk. However, in real life situations mental health workers and service users were uncertain about who should hold responsibility for recovery. Mental health workers and service users expressed a mutually perceived need to manage risk of relapse resulting in a more traditional concept of 'recovering from' contaminating discourses of 'recovering in' a mental illness. Mental health workers retain responsibility for recovery in the context of RMP and as such, service users comply with conditions set by mental health workers to gain some responsibility for recovery. It is a diluted 'risk-contaminated' form of recovery that is implemented in to practice. The thesis concludes by considering implications and making recommendations for future policy, practice and training.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.656856  DOI: Not available
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