Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.654549
Title: The productions of techno-politics: and its inevitable failure of ICT4ED projects
Author: Tolu, Huseyin
ISNI:       0000 0004 5358 8362
Awarding Body: University of Bristol
Current Institution: University of Bristol
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
This thesis examines briefly the history of Information Communication Technology (ICT) for Educational. Development (ICT4ED) projects and ICT projects in the state of Turkey since 1984, focusing on their continuing failures. The thesis locates the causes of these failures in principles of what will be referred to Techno-Politics which is the 'internal' interactions of 'Technological' innovations with 'Policy' mechanisms and 'Management' processes under a particular set of Circumstances associated with sets of Values drawn from Proprietary Close Source Software (PCSS). The study focuses on the current ICT4ED project, Fatih, which is seen as a typical educational 'reform' in a centralist education state, promising to 'fully integrate technology' into education. The study argues that the project's political execution, technical development and philosophical conception, undermine its objectives and lead to its likely failure. The thesis argues that Free Open Source Software (FOSS) is deliberately ignored in techno-politics due to; obvious, institutional inertia, path dependence and ungovernable ICT changes and arguably, corruption in new public management, 'which have made FOSS usage, formerly both feasible and flexible, 'totally' impracticable. The .thesis contrasts the corporatocracical techno-politics of PCSS with those of FOSS, highlighting their consequences as Locked-in and Hegemonic Corporatocracy with PCSS versus Free and Flexible Freedom with FOSS. The study concludes that the cotporatocracical techno-politics of PCSS can be seen as forms of 'Progress' that not only · are prone to inevitably failure, but that also inhibit other, more positive, forms of 'progress'. Nevertheless, there is more beyond 'technopolitics'.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.654549  DOI: Not available
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