Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.654463
Title: Soft power in discursive legitimisation and representation : a critical discourse analysis of China's African policy with special references to Chinese and African leadership speeches 2000 to 2009
Author: Wen , Jing
Awarding Body: Lancaster University
Current Institution: Lancaster University
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
There is now a growing body of research and publications on China's presence in Africa, as China's economic and political presence in Africa and its impact on Africa have grown rapidly in the last few years. Chinese engagement in Africa has been labelled a 'soft power' approach that provokes debate and criticism both in the West and in Africa. The term 'soft power' (Nye 1990, 2004 and 2008) in the field of International Relations (IR) describes the ability of a state or other political body to indirectly influence the behaviour or interests of other political bodies through intangible power resources such as values, culture and policies. Although the wielding of soft power is largely realized through discourse, the connection between soft power and discourse has not been made explicit or discussed in detail in Nye's work. Also, there is no adequate study on 'soft power' in discourse analysis, especially in the context of contemporary Chinese foreign policy. Discursive legitimation and representation are at the centre of wi~lding soft power in international diplomatic context. This thesis aims to examine the construction of China's soft power through a qualitative discourse analysis of legitimation and representation in China's foreign policy, in particular, China's African policy. The analytical methods highlight the interconnections between discursive legitimation, representation and national identity. This research, interdisciplinary in nature, is designed to apply discourse analysis to International Relations and thus to strengthen the linkage between Critical Discourse Analysis and politics.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.654463  DOI: Not available
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