Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.654225
Title: Women and presbyterianism in Scotland c. 1830-1930
Author: MacDonald, L. A. D.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1995
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Abstract:
The topic is introduced in chapter one with a brief consideration of its treatment (and neglect) in Scottish historiography, highlighting the significance of a presbyterian ethos in shaping the social and cultural landscape. I discuss sources, methodology, and limitations of the study. I contextualise the narrative by outlining the evolution of patriarchy as an organising principle in post-Reformation society, and of the 'separate spheres' doctrine which dominated discourse about women throughout the period. Chapter two looks at the development of women's work within the presbyterian denominations, and how that was related to the general industrial and professional employment of female labour in Scotland. Chapter three explores the involvement of women in the foreign missions of the church. Chapter four examines the official position of women within the presbyterian polity of the main denominations, and the options available to those who sought to challenge and change female exclusion from major campaigns to transform aspects of their society: anti-slavery; temperance; the struggle for access to higher education; the women's suffrage campaign. It focuses particularly on the ways in which people, policies and practices were influenced by presbyterianism, and vice versa and analyses, in the Scottish context, the claim that Protestantism was an almost essential precondition for the development of feminism in the western world. Chapter six is an attempt, based on the research, and on insights from contemporary feminist theology, to assess whether presbyterianism in Scotland during the period could be characterised as a source of liberation or oppression for women. Appendix I is a comparative case study of two local branches of the Church of Scotland Woman's Guild.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.654225  DOI: Not available
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