Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.653599
Title: Reflections of identity in the city : neoclassical architecture and urbanism as a tool of remembrance and nationhood
Author: Kynourgiopoulou, V.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2007
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Abstract:
This is an interpretative thesis. Its purpose is to present an accessible and synthetic view of neo-classical architecture and urbanism in Greece in the years following the Greek Revolution of 1821. The forms and styles of the neo-classical buildings of Athens and urban plans are examined with the intention of interpreting their meaning in the society of 1821-1900s. Through this research I attempt to articulate and examine the significant aspects of neo-classical Athens and relate them to the larger themes of neo-classical architecture as a whole. This thesis sets out to examine the reasons for the building of neo-classical architecture in the city of Athens, in the period 1821-1900s, and the effect such a monumental architecture had on Greece’s national politics. I am also examining the artistic productions of the time and the “depiction of the Greek reality” as it was perceived by the Greeks abroad. Moreover, I am aiming to link Greek neo-classical architecture with politics and economics and identify the role of memory for the creation of Modern Greek identity. Great emphasis is placed on the idea of nationalism as “state-to-be”, as the prerequisite for self-identification. This thesis investigates the active role of the past, in the society of 1821-1900, the negotiation of power among different interest groups, the attempts of the authorities to legitimise their existence through an appeal to ancient authority, and the counter attempts of the Greek people to resist dominant groups. This whole dissertation is based on the use of the past by Europe and Greece in the nineteenth century.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.653599  DOI: Not available
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