Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.653266
Title: Lexical segmentation and word recognition in fluent aphasia
Author: Kelly, M. L.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1994
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Abstract:
The current thesis reports a psycholinguistic study of lexical segmentation and word recognition in fluent aphasia. When listening to normal running speech we must identify individual words from a continuous stream before we can extract a linguistic message from it. Normal listeners are able to resolve the segmentation problem without any noticeable difficulty. In this thesis I consider how fluent aphasic listeners perform the process of lexical segmentation and whether any of their impaired comprehension of spoken language has its provenance in the failure to segment speech normally. The investigation was composed of a series of 5 experiments which examined the processing of both explicit acoustic and prosodic cues to word juncture and features which affect listeners' segmentation of the speech stream implicitly, through inter-lexical competition of potential word matches. The data collected show that lexical segmentation of continuous speech is compromised in fluent aphasia. Word hypotheses do not always accrue appropriate activational information from all the available sources within the time frame in which segmentation problem is normally resolved. The fluent aphasic performance, although quantitatively impaired compared to normal, reflects an underlying normal competence; their processing seldom displays a totally qualitatively different processing profile to normal. They are able to engage frequency, morphological structure, and imageability as modulators of activation. Word class, a feature found to be influential in the normal resolution of segmentation is not used by the fluent aphasic studied.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.653266  DOI: Not available
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