Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.653133
Title: Infrared and optical studies of cool low-mass dwarfs
Author: Jones, H.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1995
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Abstract:
Infrared and optical studies of cool low-mass dwarfs are made in order to determine their properties. The goal of distinguishing low-mass stars from brown dwarfs is engaged by studies on a number of different fronts. (1) The first infrared spectral sequence of cool dwarfs from GL411 (M2V) to GD165B (>M10V) enables derivation of reliable bolometric luminosities down to the hydrogen burning limit. The strength of the deep water absorption bands is used as the basis of a new reliable method to calculate effective temperatures. We find that GD165B is the only star in the sample that is a good brown dwarf candidate. (2) Expected temperatures, metallicities and gravities of cool dwarfs are compared to inferences from fitting synthetic to observed spectra at the peak of the energy distribution. A good representation of the overall spectral features is found, although the study is limited by (i) the quality of atomic and molecular opacities and (ii) the complex behaviour of atomic lines having strengths which increase with decreasing metallicity down to around -1.5 dex. The comparisons suggest a similar spread in metallicities to that anticipated, although for our sample neither kinematic motion nor membership of a particular photometric class are, on their own, reliable indicators of metallicity. (3) A high resolution study of the strongest water vapour absorption band in cool dwarfs is compared to predictions from a preliminary ab initio computation for water vapour incorporated into a stellar atmosphere calculation. The comparisons show that water vapour lines are formed relatively high in the photosphere at pressures about an order of magnitude lower than atomic lines.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.653133  DOI: Not available
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