Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.652997
Title: The politics of speculation : on power and utopia
Author: Jenson, Michael Kent
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1996
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Abstract:
Within the realm of politics, there are two forces which have considerable influence upon the social dynamics of a civilisation because they comprise the fundamental desires of human nature and influence the common aspirations that a society might possess. They are the components of human striving which presuppose all political systems and societal constructs. The first of these aspects is defined as the utopian impulse and pertains to the forward looking or visionary component of a culture. It is the element of a societies' common will that sets forth the image of the desired future which motivates its social and political structures to produce corresponding speculative projections in real and practical terms. Without a consciousness of such objectives, the progress of a civilisation may falter and cultural atrophy sets in which leads to an overall decline in the quality of life of its people. If the trend continues unabated, cultural stagnation sets in, giving rise to social unrest, apathy, and disillusionment. Closely related to this, is another intrinsic drive contained within human nature that compels Mankind to forge the social and political constructs that have the ability to transform the narrative devised by the utopian consciousness into a practical political discourse that presupposes the political act. It is this alliance of utopian speculation and the existing hierarchies of Power which provides the basic attributes needed to bring about transformations of the institutions for the progress of the culture as a whole. Consequently, coupled with these potential benefits are the dangers of repression and alienation that can also be products of such a relationship of desires.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.652997  DOI: Not available
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