Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.652994
Title: Theology in Japan : Takakura Tokutaro
Author: Jennings, J. E.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1995
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Abstract:
Takakura Tokutaro was a Japanese Christian who lived during the years 1885-1934. Despite having played important leadership roles within the Protestant Church in Japan during the 1920's and early 1930's, his name is scarcely known outside limited Japanese theological circles. This thesis seeks to give Takakura some of the recognition which his place in the Christian Church deserves. This thesis focuses its examination on Takakura's thought, all the while emphasising his own particular, historical context. Takakura's life spanned a critical period in the life of a rapidly-changing Japan that had joined the "modern family of nations" since its mind-boggling growth from the Meiji Restoration of 1868. Moreover, the Church into which he was converted was just completing the first generation of its existence since the arrival in Japan of Western missionaries in 1859. Hence how Takakura understood and came to articulate the Christian faith says much about the Church of the incomparable Meiji period (1868-1912), as well as about his own generation of Christians who lived in the ensuing Taisho (1912-1926) and Showa (1926-) eras. Furthermore, Takakura's close interaction with Western thought is instructive concerning the universalisation of Christian theology during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Along with spending over two years in the West, Takakura did extensive reading in both British and German theology. How he received the Christian faith through these cross-cultural media, then adapted it into his own linguistic and religio-cultural context, demonstrates not only what happened with Takakura individually, but also what has been happening world-wide for the past two centuries. The thesis will thus seek to gain further insight from Takakura's example into the still relatively recent universalising trend in Christian thought.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.652994  DOI: Not available
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