Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.652645
Title: Information, support and parental stress in families with a child with a learning disability : the role of diagnosis
Author: Howie-Davies, R.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2006
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Abstract:
Research on stress in parents with a child with a learning disability, has found many different factors which impact on stress. One of these factors is support; however there has been little research on the effect of information provision on parental stress. This study investigates differences in information, support and stress between families with a child with a specific and non-specific learning disability diagnosis. The relationship between information, support and stress is also investigated. The sample consisted of 24 parents of children with a non-specific diagnosis and 23 parents of children with a specific diagnosis. Parents completed a demographic, diagnosis and information questionnaire, the Family Support Scale, and a short-form of the Questionnaire on Resources and Stress. Parents of children with a specific diagnosis had accessed significantly more sources of information and were more likely to have accessed a support organisation. However there were found to be no differences between the two groups regarding the amount of and satisfaction with the information and support received. There were no significant relationships between the information or support variables and perceived parental stress. The main difference between parents of a child with a specific and non-specific learning disability diagnosis appears to be accessibility rather than quality of information and support available.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psychol.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.652645  DOI: Not available
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