Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.652284
Title: Prostate cancer and diet in Scottish men
Author: Heald, Charlotte Lucinda
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2005
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Abstract:
This thesis examines the association between diet and PCa in Scottish men, based on the PCANDIET study: A population based case-control study of PCa in relation to inherited susceptibility and diet. Data on the habitual diets of 433 cases diagnosed with PCa and 483 controls were collected using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Significant odds ratios (Ors) (adjusted for energy intake, age, family history of PCa, Carstairs deprivation index, smoking and EI: BMR ratio) for highest intake versus lowest intake (reference) categories were observed for cholesterol (OR 1.57 95%CI, 1.04-2.37); red meat (OR 1.64, 95%CI 1.09-2.48); vegetables (OR 0.62, 95%CI 0.41-0.93); consumption of alcohol (OR 0.62, 95%CI 0.42-0.90), total alcohol (OR 0.66, 95%CI 0.44-0.99); wine (OR 0.38, 95%CI 0.19-0.74) and spirits (OR 0.48, 95%CI 0.29-0.79). Significant associations were also observed for protein (OR 2.34, 95%CI 1.13-4.87) and red meat (OR 3.74, 95%CI 1.70-8.15) within younger subjects, and for selenium (OR 0.61, 95%CI 0.37-0.99), vegetables (OR 0.60, 95%CI 0.36-0.99), wine (OR 0.21,95%CI 0.8-0.52) and spirits (OR 0.49, 95%CI 0.26-0.91) within older subjects. These results suggest that cholesterol and red meat are both associated with a 60% increase in PCa risk, whereas vegetables and alcohol are associated with a 40% reduction in PCa risk. The results also suggest that protein and red meat are associated with over a two-fold and three-fold increase in PCa risk respectively in younger men. Whereas, selenium and vegetables are associated with 40% reduction in PCa risk in older men, in addition to a further reduction in risk of PCa associated with wine and spirit is (80% and 50% respectively).
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.652284  DOI: Not available
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