Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.652194
Title: Nuclear magnetic resonance scanning in schizophrenia
Author: Harvey, I.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1990
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Abstract:
This work aimed to detect cerebral abnormalities in schizophrenia affecting the volume or T1 relaxation time of specific anatomical structures. Sixty-seven schizophrenics under fifty years of age, recruited from admissions to two teaching hospitals, underwent nuclear magnetic resonance scanning at 0.5 Tesla along with thirty-six matched healthy controls. Twenty coronal and twenty-four transverse contiguous slices were obtained and subsequently viewed blind to group status. Methods of adequate reliability were developed to estimate volumes of the cerebrum, cortex, sulcal fluid, temporal lobes and lateral ventricles and to measure T1 times in the centrum semiovale and basal ganglia. Volumetric data from forty-eight patients, analysed using multiple regression to control for the influenced of intra-cranialvolume, revealed a significant increase in sulcal fluid and diffuse reduction in cerebral volume compared to thirty-four controls. This was primarily due to reduction in cortical rather than subcortical tissue. Patients also had a decreased right temporal lobe volume. These changes bore no close relationship to clinical variables. Factors that influence T1 times in normal subjects were identified, through the additional serial scanning of two healthy males, before comparing the patient and control groups. No group differences in either the white matter or basal ganglia T1 times were found. An animal model was used to assess the effect of neuroleptic drugs on T1 values over four weeks, and no sustained alteration was seen.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (M.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.652194  DOI: Not available
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