Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.652154
Title: Studies in the industrial history of the occupied territories of Russian Poland during the First World War, 1914-1918
Author: Harris, E. E.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1979
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Abstract:
This study examines three branches of industry during the Austrian and German occupation of Russian Poland. The coal industry, after a period of dislocation in 1914-1915, was in both zones under military direction and was exploited intensively, mainly to supply fuel for military railway consumption. Improvements to infrastructure and plant were made during the occupation, although productivity fell, due to inputs shortages and loss of skilled labour to Silesia. In the metallurgical industries and textiles, both branches heavily dependent on imported raw materials and geared to Russian demand, production largely ceased on the outbreak of war, with the exception of plants supplying the military market. In the German zone the Bilaystok textile industry and some Warsaw and Dabrowa engineering plants continued thus employed through the war; elsewhere in this zone, in view of persisting closures, the export to the Reich of raw materials, skilled labour and finally finished goods was decreed, although capital stock was largely left intact. In the Austrian zone the authorities attempted to prevent drainage of resources and instigated the reactivation of some part of capacity in iron and steel production. In both regions in the second half of the war some revival of domestic demand combined with military orders to reactivate production in finishing plant in the metallurgical branch. Although all branches suffered varying degrees of skilled labour loss and capital stock depletion, and were by 1918 largely drained of raw materials, the major problems of postwar reconstruction were structural, linked with severance from Russia and union with Upper Silesia.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.652154  DOI: Not available
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