Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.652082
Title: Technological change in the pharmaceutical industry in Japan and the United Kingdom
Author: Hara, Takuji
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2001
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Abstract:
This thesis explores the process of technological change in the pharmaceutical industry. Although pharmaceuticals are crucial in modern society, the shaping process of this technology is not fully understood. In particular, the social aspect of the process is seldom examined. Despite the lack of close empirical studies, the process is often assumed to be a linear process from scientific research through technological and clinical development to market. This thesis demonstrates that this is not the case, through a comparative, multiple case study including sixteen cases of major drug innovation in Japan and the United Kingdom. The shaping process of pharmaceuticals is not linear but interactive and multilateral. Four aspects of the process are identified, namely the shaping of the compound, of the application, of organisational authorisation and of the market. In each aspect, various social groups, non-human entities, and historical, structural and cultural factors are differently involved. Different aspects of drug shaping also interact with each other. In addition, three types of drug innovation are identified, namely, paradigmatic innovation, application innovation and modification-based innovation. Each type of innovation has distinctive features. Historical, structural and cultural factors, which significantly affect the shaping process of drugs but are often invisible, are also considered through a comparison between Japanese and British drug innovation.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.652082  DOI: Not available
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