Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.651767
Title: The emplantation of religion, the development of Buddhism and Christianity in Korea
Author: Grayson, J. H.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1979
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Abstract:
The general problem of the emplantation of missionary religions is considered from the viewpoint of culture change. Unit One outlines the problem, and a tentative model of the emplantation of religion is proposed based on a survey of the history of the introduction of Buddhism into China. The development of Buddhism and Christianity in Korea is then considered in relation to the model. Unit Two establishes the nature of pre-Buddhist Korean religion; Unit Three examines the growth of Buddhism in ancient Korea; Unit Four reviews the development of both Catholic and Protestant Christianity in Korea; and Unit Five contrasts the development of Buddhism Catholicism and Froteatantism with the model outlined in Unit One. The emplantation of missionary religions is considered as a social process which consists of three related phases and various subphases. The nature of these phases is defined and five factors which may influence the growth of a newly emplanted religion are distinguished. The general model is seen also to consist of two submodels which are characterized by the speed of the process of emplantation and the presence or absence of a key phase, the phase of Contact and Emplication implantation which occurs between two cultural spheres and emplantation which occurs within, a single cultural sphere are also discussed. The thesis concludes by suggesting the usefulness of models of this type in understanding the social dynamics of the process.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.651767  DOI: Not available
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