Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.651533
Title: Fertility regulation : from laboratory bench to service delivery
Author: Glasier, A.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2005
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Abstract:
The publications included in this thesis cover four broad areas of fertility regulation. Postpartum contraception. This section includes a number of studies investigating mechanisms underlying lactational amenorrhoea together with three studies investigating the relationship between infant feeding practices and the duration of amenorrhoea. A study on the effect of progestin-only oral contraception on bone mineral density during lactation and two studies on the timing and quality of advice about post-partum contraception complete this section. Modern methods of contraception. A number of general reviews of modern methods of contraception are included in this section together with an overview of new developments and possible future methods. Original work includes studies on continuation rates of Norplant; acceptability of future methods (male and female): ovulation during the use of hormone replacement therapy; morphological and functional changes in the endometrium of women using low dose progestogen only methods and the use of antiprogestogens for various approaches to female contraception. Abortion. The papers in this section concentrate mainly on service delivery issues including the establishment of a centralised referral system: audit of quality of care; counselling: acceptability and patient satisfaction. Emergency Contraception. Original work on the efficacy and mode of action of emergency contraception: knowledge among teenagers; prevalence of chlamydia infection among women using emergency contraception (EC) and the need for de-regulation of EC are included in this section. The thesis ends with three studies on advanced administration of EC and its effect on use, risk taking behaviour and abortion rates.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Sc.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.651533  DOI: Not available
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