Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.651128
Title: Scotland's missing Zolas? : fiction by women 1900-1940
Author: Freeman, Alan
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1994
Availability of Full Text:
Access through EThOS:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Please try the link below.
Access through Institution:
Abstract:
This thesis joins in the attempt to open some of the avenues which remained closed to the leading lights of Scotland's 1920s literary renaissance, establishing the innovative, feminist, and pluralistic intent in the best of women's fiction in the first half of this century, and locating it in a broader context identified as the 'parallel agenda'. Part One, Parallel Agenda, defines the basis of the thesis, outlining in the opening chapter, Double Marginalisation, the marginalisation undergone by Scottish writers within Britain, and by women writers within patriarchal culture, in general and in the particular experience of the authors studied. It challenges the orthodoxies constructed by the likes of Hugh MacDiarmid and George Blake with regard to the range of work produced in Scotland, and the nature of that produced by women. Chapter two, Women's Fiction And The Romantic Paradigm, defines alternative criteria by which to evaluate this fiction, relating it to the over-arching influence of Romanticism, in which the tension between individual and society is crystallised, and whose exponents show distinct differences according to gender. The chapter goes on to delineate a diagrammatic framework in which the authors' narrative strategies will be detailed in subsequent chapters. The second part is titled Divided Selves, and takes up the issue of individuality as located in the tradition of dualism found throughout writing of the Romantic and subsequent eras. In chapter three, Dualism And Self-Defence, dualism among Scottish writers is considered alongside that attributed to women writers by recent criticism, and the applicability and limitation of each discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.651128  DOI: Not available
Share: