Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.650037
Title: Globalization, English and the German university classroom
Author: Erling, E. J.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2004
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Abstract:
This thesis surveys current theories of globalization and then inspects the effects of this phenomenon on the English language. Not only has the English language changed as a result of globalization, but discourse about English has changed. This thesis will thus test the relevance of contemporary theories of English to find if they match the reality of how English is being acquired, used and appropriated in the present age. Since globalization is appropriated differently by the various societies it affects, it is important to consider each individual place with its specific history, culture and politics to evaluate different outcomes. For this reason, this thesis examines of the presence of English in the specific national context of Germany, but focuses on a group who uses the language regularly for a variety of international purposes: students of English at the Freie Universität Berlin. Methods used in this analysis include a qualitative analysis of questionnaires, discourse analysis of ethnographic interviews with students and grammatical and stylistic analyses of student essays and assignments. The results of this study shed light on various student attitudes towards and motivations for learning English as well as their means of identifying with the language. Therefore, this work also gives insights into the complex outcomes of globalization. Finally, this work suggests important pedagogical implications for English language teaching as a result of these developments.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.650037  DOI: Not available
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