Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.649960
Title: Challenging normativity in counselling psychology
Author: Naidoo, Delan
Awarding Body: City University London
Current Institution: City, University of London
Date of Award: 2012
Availability of Full Text:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Restricted access.
Please contact the current institution’s library for further details.
Abstract:
Controlled drug use is a phenomenon that has been described by previous researchers. There are few such studies which explore the clubbing or gay/bisexual populations . Research frequently looking at gay/bisexual men's drug-taking fails to acknowledge the possibilities of controlled drug use. This study takes a qualitative approach to the data in an attempt to explore the phenomenon as it exists. Eight men who identified as gay/bisexual and took drugs on a controlled basis participated in semi-structured inteNiews. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was used to analyse the data which indicated master themes emerging from the participants' communicated experiences. These themes related to intra-psychic; identity/interpersonal interaction; and temporal processes. Results show that not all gay/bisexual men's drug use follows a usage-addiction pattern and that controlled drug use is possible. Participants indicated that they were able to control their drug use through an interaction of personality traits, social factors and self-knowledge or monitoring. It is posited that the research enhances the understanding of controlled drug use, especially within the gay/bisexual clubbing sub-culture. Furthermore, it clarifies strategies that could be useful for other drug-taking populations who wish to control their drug use. The cycle of and the reasons for the drug-taking behaviour are possible routes for further research.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.649960  DOI: Not available
Share: