Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.649842
Title: Vulnerability to depression : the role of dependency and self-criticism, and gender-related differences
Author: Dyson, S.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2000
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Abstract:
The concept of vulnerability to depression has been incorporated into most current models of depression. While differing terminology is used, essentially there is agreement that two specific traits act as vulnerability factors: Dependency and Self-criticism. As vulnerability factors, they are seen to be stable characteristics that are present regardless of mood-state. The research so far has provided conflicting evidence for this stability. In addition, there is some evidence that suggests a gender difference in the experience of these vulnerabilities. This study aimed to further investigate the nature of these factors and the possible gender differences. Comparisons were made between three groups comprising currently depressed individuals, individuals with a previous diagnosis of depression who had recovered, and a control group of individuals who had never been depressed. Each participant completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and two measures of dependency and self-criticism: the Depressive Experiences questionnaire (DEQ) and the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale-24 (DAS-24). Based on findings from previous research, it was hypothesised that Dependency and Self-criticism would be greater in the currently depressed and recovered depressed groups than in the control group. Further to this, gender differences were expected to be found only in the recovered group, with male participants expected to be more dependent than female participants. Results were considered in the context of the relevant literature and suggestions were offered for future research.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.649842  DOI: Not available
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