Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.649838
Title: Exploring family functioning post stroke
Author: Dyer, Camilla F.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2007
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Abstract:
The aim of this study was to explore the impact of an older person’s stroke on family functioning. Stroke patients, aged 65 or over, and members of their family were compared to a control group of older people without stroke and members of their family. The researcher was also interested in how individual functioning may act as possible contributory factors, consequently affecting family functioning as a whole. A cross sectional between groups design was employed. Stroke patients (aged 65 and over) and family members were compared to a healthy control group of older adults and family members. The participants completed assessments measuring family functioning, perceived family quality of life, perceived social support, and current mood. The main result was that, in families where an older person had a stroke, the stroke did not negatively impact on family functioning. Group comparisons revealed that the stroke and control group did not differ on measures of family functioning, perceived social support and mood. However, older people with stroke reported a lower perceived quality of life than older people without stroke. The latter result suggests a possible area for intervention for clinicians working with older people with stroke. Interpreted within a family life cycle and individual developmental perspective, the results suggest that older people suffering strokes may be expected, and as such this expectation may act as a coping mechanism for dealing with the illnesses and losses that people are faced with in their later life. Methodological limitations of the study and suggestions for further research are discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.649838  DOI: Not available
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