Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.649833
Title: Manufacture, marketing and manipulation : an insight into aspects of the international and domestic legal response to new synthetic drugs of abuse
Author: Dwyer, Peggy
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2000
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Abstract:
The spread of variable chemical compounds that can be manipulated only slightly in order to produce an unknown number of 'legal' recreational drugs has exposed serious limitations of the domestic and global control regimes. Despite the significant amount of publicity devoted to the 'designer' drug scare and the increasing popularity of 'ecstasy' pills, very little has been written on the legal response to new synthetic drugs of abuse. This thesis aims to go some way towards filling an obvious gap in the debate on this area of drug control. In order to assist the reader to understand the new phenomenon, Part I offers a brief history of synthetic psychotropic drug use, before concentrating on the nature of the trend towards the production and consumption of 'designer' drugs. Part II outlines existing international controls, highlighting the shortcomings of the two relevant UN treaties. The third and final Part looks at recent legal initiatives, introduced at a national, international and European level, in order to address the ever expanding supply of and demand for new synthetic drugs. This thesis does not purport to provide any easy solution, for indeed any 'solution' at all, to what is a significant law enforcement concern. It does, however, offer a balanced assessment of legal measures developed to deal with NSDs. It is submitted that further attention must be given to an evaluated of law and policy in order to determine which of the reforms thus far introduced have been most successful in minimising the harm related to these drugs. Only then will we be better positioned to deal with the next generation of synthetic compounds manufactured for the clandestine market.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.649833  DOI: Not available
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