Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.649704
Title: Investigation of patient-controlled analgesia for the treatment of postoperative pain in children
Author: Doyle, Edward
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1996
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Abstract:
The work incorporated in this thesis was conceived and carried out with the aim of investigating the efficacy and the incidence of side effects when different regimens for patient-controlled analgesia with morphine sulphate are used in children. Features of interest were the size of the bolus dose, the place of a background infusion and its magnitude, alternatives to the intravenous route of administration and the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting. In a comparison of patient-controlled analgesia with and without a background infusion there were no significant differences in the pain scores of the two groups although there were more side effects in the background group. There was also a better sleep pattern in this group. In a comparison of different background infusions, the inclusion of a background infusion of 4 micrograms kg-1 hour-1 did not increase the incidence of side effects and was associated with less hypoxaemia and a better sleep pattern than no background infusion although it did not improve the efficacy of the technique. When pain was assessed after movement, the inclusion of a background infusion of 4 micrograms kg-1 hour-1 improved analgesia and was associated with less hypoxaemia and a better sleep pattern than no background infusion. When bolus doses of 10 micrograms kg-1 and 20 micrograms kg-1 were compared, 20 micrograms kg-1 produced lower pain scores and fewer hypoxaemic episodes than 10 micrograms kg-1. There were no differences between the groups in the incidence of side effects. In comparison of intravenous and subcutaneous infusions for the treatment of postoperative pain there were no differences between the groups in pain scores or the incidence of side effects.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (M.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.649704  DOI: Not available
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