Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.649620
Title: A study of depression in second generation South Asian women in Scotland
Author: Donaghy, Eddie
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1997
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Abstract:
This thesis investigated the nature of severe life events and strength of social support in two groups of second generation South Asian women in Scotland, one with and one without depression, using a semi-structured interview approach. The development of mental illness caused by the stresses of migration have been found in minority populations in studies throughout the world. The process of acculturation, the adaptation of cultural traditions by ethnic minority groups to facilitate living in and with majority white indigenous communities, can be a stressful experience on a number of fronts. This can be particularly so for women from ethnic communities, such as those found in the South Asia community, which lay emphasis on the role of women in the maintenance of cultural traditions. For some women, conflicts can arise out of this process and develop into severe life events. In the absence of social support such conflicts, according to the Brown and Harris model of depression, increase the risk of these women developing depression. This thesis addresses the methodological issues of cross-gender and cross-'race' research. It gives an overview of the diverse experiences of second generation South Asian women in Britain and abroad. It contends that as a consequence of the acculturation process, conflicts over gender can arise. It concludes by asserting that second generation South Asian women can experience loss of a valued idea or aspiration associated with a social role and that such an experience constitutes a severe life event, which in the absence of a strong confiding relationship, increases the risk of depression in these women. To a lesser extent this is also the outcome where on-going major difficulties and severe event without loss is experience. The Brown and Harris model of depression is, therefore, relevant when considering the mental health of second generation South Asian women in Britain and abroad.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.649620  DOI: Not available
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