Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.649530
Title: Characterisation of organometallic materials for IC processes
Author: Dicks, Martin H.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2004
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Abstract:
This thesis reports on the characterisation of platinum features which were deposited and patterned using UV (ultra violet) exposure of a solid photosensitive organometallic material through a mask. The work aims to evaluate the process for its use in present and future semiconductor technology. A range of devices including resistive and capacitive test structures as well as MOS transistors were produced using platinum deposited using the organometallic process and characterised by standard methods. The deposited films were found to be metallic and have a good adhesion to silicon dioxide, although their resistivity is higher than the one of bulk platinum. Measurements on platinum MOS capacitors showed their capacitance curves to agree well with curves from aluminium capacitors on the same substrate albeit the curves of capacitors on chips which incorporated MOS transistors indicated interface traps. Threshold and source-drain characteristics of platinum gate transistors are presented and these results are compared with aluminium gate transistors manufactured on the same substrate. Both sets of characteristics are very similar with the major difference being that the platinum gate devices have a lower sub-threshold slope, an effect which was attributed to trap charges at the silicon/silicon dioxide interface. The work also found that structures produced were generally larger than expected and spectroscopy methods showed contaminants to be present in the films.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.649530  DOI: Not available
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