Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.649512
Title: Communist and Labourist paths to 'new times'
Author: Diamanti, Filio
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1992
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Abstract:
This thesis is about the changing idea of socialism in post-war Britain with emphasis on the period leading up to, and following from the emergence of Thatcherism as a successful political force. Its focus is upon the interrelation between theory and policy statements in regard to the Labour Party and the Communist Party of Great Britain. As necessarily bound up with the interrelation, the New Left's theoretical understanding of Marxist categories of analysis, are discussed in the light of political theory and practice. The main focus is on how Marxism is gradually transformed, especially in the analysis of 'New Times', from an ideology of rupture into one of adaptation in the 1980s, an era where belief in collectivism was rejected in favour of the discursive, individual subject which has only a plural identity. A discussion of the importance of Marxist categories of analysis is also attempted in connection with the Left's analysis of the changing political environment. Party programmes and other statements are used as a basis for examining the theoretical understanding of socialism; the writings of the most influential of the British and Continental theorists are also discussed. The theoretical debates of the 1950s to the 1970s are surveyed as the starting point for an understanding of the political and theoretical approaches adopted in the 1980s. Finally, an assessment of the use of Marxist categories of analysis such as exploitation is undertaken in order to show how the re-thinking of these categories in relation to the idea of socialism has influenced the left's theory and practice in the epoch of 'New Times'.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.649512  DOI: Not available
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