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Title: The representation of the cathedral in French visual culture, 1870-1914
Author: Curie, M. C. J.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2006
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Abstract:
This thesis presents an analysis of the way in which northern French cathedrals were represented and understood by artists between 1870 and 1914. The issues dealt with start with the role played by the representation of French cathedrals in the context of the Année Terrible of 1870-1871. The analysis of a number of representations from varied sources demonstrates the importance of the notion of nationalism when considering the cathedrals between the Franco-Prussian War and the beginning of World War One. The religious and spiritual side of the cathedral is examined through a range of visual documents presenting images from Catholic painters as well as through the connection established between the Church and the State during the Ralliement. A specific focus is given to painters Camille Pissarro and Maximilien Luce, whose representations of cathedrals need to be assessed in terms of their strong anarchist views. This examination demonstrates how anarchism and religious buildings such as cathedrals could work together in images towards the promotion of the anarchist ideal. Two case studies also allow for a greater depth of understanding of the messages carried by cathedrals between 1870 and 1914. Many artists represented the cathedral churches of Rouen and Paris, and an analysis of these images brings out the range of ideas which can be associated with cathedrals in the visual arts. The French cathedral was an essential figure of the French visual culture between 1870 and 1914 because of its power of suggestion. It was in turn a Catholic church, a nationalist emblem, an anarchist symbol, and a motif utilised by artists to experiment with new pictorial ideas. Between 1870 and 1914 it took on significant new artistic and political dimensions.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.649027  DOI: Not available
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