Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.645872
Title: Private security in international politics : deconstructing the state's monopoly of security governance
Author: Cullen, Patrick Jerome
Awarding Body: London School of Economics and Political Science (University of London)
Current Institution: London School of Economics and Political Science (University of London)
Date of Award: 2009
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Please try the link below.
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
This thesis examines the theoretical implications of private security for International Relations (IR) theory and global politics from the perspective of a security governance model. It draws upon multi-disciplinary theoretical research on private security to both map the way security governance has been de-linked from the state, as well as to map the public-private hybrids and security networks that constitute private security's continued connection to the state. On one level, this thesis engages in a direct theoretical critique of Realist theory and its Weberian inspired understanding of the state's monopoly of security governance. Thus, the security governance framework used within this thesis is understood in terms of a theoretical response to the inability of Realist theory to conceptualize the political content of private security. Against this backdrop of a critique of Realist theory-and its idea of the state's monopoly relationship to authority, territory and coercion-this thesis re-articulates each of these concepts with reference to a security governance approach to the study of private security. This thesis then provides a positive application of this security governance theoretical framework to a series of original case studies of hybrid public-private and private- private security networks.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.645872  DOI: Not available
Share: