Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.645200
Title: The deepest south : a comparative analysis of issues of exile in the work of selected women writers from South Africa and the American South
Author: Meisel, Jacqueline Susan
Awarding Body: Lancaster University
Current Institution: Lancaster University
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
This thesis examines the ways in which exile, both actual and metaphorical, informs the work of four pathbreaking female writers from South Africa and the American south: Carson McCullers, Bessie Head, Zoe Wicomb and Dorothy Allison. In this study, exilic consciousness is closely linked to postcolonial, nomadic feminisms which can best be understood as liminal, as fundamentally' out of place'. The border-crossings involved here are not only geographical, they also signify a change rn critical consciousness, as the foundational texts of this thesis-Rosi Braidotti's Nomadic Feminism and Francoise Lionnet and Shu-Mei Shih's Minor Transnationalism-indicate. By exploring writers who problematise the categories of race, gender, sexuality and class I demonstrate how these writers offer new ways of reading the postcolonial condition as nomadic, and I examine the shared processes that nations and individuals undergo as they experience political and personal liberation struggles. My thesis is divided into four main parts. The opening section offers both an introduction to, and rationale for, the study, providing historical and sociocultural contextualization linking South Africa and the American south; it goes on to establish my choices of Carson McCullers and Dorothy Allison as the southern US writers in this study and Bessie Head and Zoe Wicomb as the South Africans. In opening chapter I interrogate self-representation and variations in autobiography by the four writers. Chapter 2 has as its focus body and exilic consciousness in selected work by all four writers. My final chapter examines identity formation as situated subjectivity in the work of Allison and Wicomb who are foregrounded here.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.645200  DOI: Not available
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