Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.645188
Title: The development of breast and bottle feeding in human infants
Author: Crow, Rosemary A.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1978
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Abstract:
This thesis describes an observational study of the development of feeding behaviour in the breast and bottle fed human infant from birth to six months. The main aim was to explore the capacity of the infant to express satiety behaviourally. Naturally occurring behaviours were identified and categorised according to various objectively defined criteria during an initial period of observation on approximately 60 mother-infant pairs. A further sample of 20 mother-infant pairs was then used to examine more systematically a selected group of these behaviours. Each pair was visited at monthly intervals from birth to six months, and it is the data drawn from the results of these visits which forms the basis of this thesis. In the exploration of the infant's capacity to express satiety, an attempt was first made to identify potential satiety signals. Behaviours were observed in the neonate which had this potential, but the nature of their expression was found to depend upon age and feeding technique. The value placed on these potential signals was then assessed through the mother's behaviour, where it was found that her behaviour varied according to the feeding technique. Differences were described in terms of the concept of mother or infant control. Discussion of the findings brought out the possible influences that milk composition and the nature of mother control may have on the opportunities available for development in the infant's feeding behavioural repertoire.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.645188  DOI: Not available
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