Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.645182
Title: Clinical and microbiological features of periodontal disease in HIV-seropositive individuals
Author: Cross, David Logan
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1994
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Abstract:
29 HIV seropositive patients and 27 seronegative patients were examined during the course of the study. Clinical data was collected from a total of 14,244 sites and subgingival plaque samples were collected from 1,461 sites. A total of 6,832 hybridisations were successfully completed, identifying over 16,000 colonies to a species level on nylon colony lifts. On initial analysis, HIV seropositive subjects had a marked tendency for increased mean attachment loss compared to the HIV seronegative controls in this sample. The HIV seropositive subjects were also found to harbour a higher mean percentage of P. gingivalis, and had a higher mean percentage of sites exhibiting suppuration than the HIV seronegative subjects. A subgroup of 9 HIV seropositive subjects was identified with widespread periodontal disease. In conclusion, this study confirms that there exists a subgroup of HIV seropositive patients who are at risk for an increased incidence of destructive periodontal disease. However, so many potential confounding factors associated with HIV infection and treatment exist, that identification of those patients who are at risk for periodontal disease may be difficult. Periodontal predictors of increased immunosuppression as HIV disease progresses are unlikely to be very powerful, even if they prove to be reliable, as not every patient with HIV infection in this study suffered from periodontal disease despite some patients having severe immunosuppression.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.645182  DOI: Not available
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