Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.644583
Title: The effect of interval training on clinical and physiological outcomes in patients with inclusion body myositis and mitochondrial disorders
Author: Jones, Katherine Louise
ISNI:       0000 0004 5356 7908
Awarding Body: University of Newcastle Upon Tyne
Current Institution: University of Newcastle upon Tyne
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
Aim: To assess the effect of high-intensity interval training on clinical and physiological outcomes in adults with inclusion body myositis and mitochondrial disorders, and sedentary adults with no myopathy. Methods: Subjects completed high-intensity interval training three times per week for 16 weeks on a bicycle ergometer. Training involved short bursts of cycling at a rate of perceived exertion of 16-18/20 on the Borg Scale, interspersed with active recovery intervals. Clinical and physiological outcomes included (i) peak work and aerobic exercise capacity (ii) resting heart rate variability (iii) lower limb strength performance (iv) whole body composition (v) fasted blood profiles (vi) fatigue impact and symptoms of anxiety and depression (vii) overall mental well-being and health-related quality of life. Results: Subjects with inclusion body myositis and mitochondrial disorders completed ≥ 70% of perceptually regulated high-intensity interval training, showing improvement in mental well-being and peak work capacity. Results also demonstrated the importance of modifiable co-morbidities, such as weight, that may contribute to individual exercise responses and general health status. Conclusion: Adults with inclusion body myositis and mitochondrial disease were able to safely perform high-intensity interval training with access to clinical support. Improvement in psychological and physiological outcome measures suggests that high-intensity interval training has therapeutic potential as an alternative to moderate-intensity continuous aerobic exercise.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.644583  DOI: Not available
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