Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.643464
Title: A systems study of air-to-ground laser operations : statistical modelling of laser energy distribution in the transient regime
Author: Flemming, Brian Keith
ISNI:       0000 0004 5354 3009
Awarding Body: Heriot-Watt University
Current Institution: Heriot-Watt University
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
Laser target designators have been used for precision guidance purposes for many years. High energy laser devices are also being developed for tactical operations. Both are examples of Class 4 devices that can produce hazardous laser output. A triangular system-risk model links system performance, the operational demand and the potential hazards associated with the system operation, and which provides the basis for a system-level probabilistic risk assessment analysis. An extension of the risk assessment model includes contextual information as an additional risk element. A decomposition model, comprising a linear combination of irradiance basis vectors based on transverse Hermite-Gaussian modes, is developed using multiple linear regression modelling for the analysis of transient mode laser output. A linear predictive mixture distribution for a multiplicative scintillation gain factor is developed from simulated optical turbulence modelling. A spatial analysis using techniques from computational topology shows an approximately uniform distribution of high scintillation gain values over the sample surface pro le. A statistical analysis of level set critical points provides a more detailed characterisation of the scintillation gain variability. The combined decomposition and scintillation gain modelling provides a `subsystemlevel' performance analysis within the overall risk assessment context.
Supervisor: Gibson, Gavin; MacPherson, Bill Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.643464  DOI: Not available
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