Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.643187
Title: The amalgamation of agricultural holdings in Scotland, 1968-1973
Author: Clark, G.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1977
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Abstract:
The thesis reports on research into the processes and effects of the amalgamation of agricultural holdings in Scotland between 1968 and 1973. Through the use of information from the Agricultural Census, it was possible to measure with considerable accuracy the rate at which agricultural holdings were amalgamating, and also to describe the socio-economic characteristics of the participating holdings. This showed that the process of amalgamation was particularly rapid in certain parts of Scotland and also among large and owner-occupied holdings. A programme of field investigation was carried out during 1974 to explain these patterns. A sample of over one hundred amalgamations in several contrasting regions of Scotland was selected using a method of cluster analysis. The analysis of the results from these investigations has provided explanations of these concentrations of amalgamating. Further investigation revealed the criteria by which amalgamation was favoured as a means of expanding a farm, and this demonstrated a weakness in the model of decision-making presently incorporated in the theory of innovation diffusion. A refinement to that model is presented. The extent of the planning preceding an amalgamation, and the changes in the way the land of the expanding holding is used after amalgamation, are also analysed. Since the amalgamation of holdings is actively supported by a system of official financial aid, there is a preliminary analysis of the use made of this aid. Consideration is given also to the broader background to structural change in British agriculture, with particular concern for the reasons which may be advanced for promoting structural change.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.643187  DOI: Not available
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