Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.642599
Title: Some aspects of the geography of livestock movement in Scotland
Author: Carlyle, William John
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1970
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Abstract:
The main purpose of this study is to identify, describe and explain the movement of store sheep and store cattle between farms in Scotland., Emphasis is placed on present-day movements, but the explanation of these inevitably involves an examination of their antecedents. The largest part of the study is devoted to an analysis of the movements of store sheep, both because the movements of sheep are more complicated than those for cattle and more information was available on them. The approach taken for both types of stores is to determine the main lines or patterns of movement and then to explain them. In each case, too, the distribution of breeds is examined, then the movement of stores for breeding and finally the movement of stores for feeding. Data obtained from livestock auction markets were the main source used for identifying the movements and personal interviews and agricultural publications provided most of the information for explaining them. Objectives of a more directly practical nature were pursued in addition to the main purpose, including an evaluation of the suitability of direct farm-to-farm transfers as compared with those via markets and the estimation of inter-regional movements, according to regions used by the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries for Scotland. Summaries of the main features of movement are given at the end of most chapters and in the conclusion aspects of the movement which could be usefully investigated in more detail are suggested.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.642599  DOI: Not available
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