Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.642549
Title: The origin and implementation of Section 12 of the Social Work (Scotland) Act 1968
Author: Campbell, Alison
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1979
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Abstract:
The thesis falls into two main parts, the first being a study of the development of social work since the 19th century, with particular reference to the issue of cash and care, and the second a more detailed examination of the way social workers have actually used the cash assistance powers of Section 12 of the Social Work (Scotland) Act 1968. Chapter 1 begins by providing a general historical background to the issue of cash and care and sketches in the development of social work legislation and of the gradual professionalisation of social workers in both England and Scotland. Chapter 2 shows that, though both Section 1 of the Children and Young Persons Act 1963 and Section 12 of the Social Work (Scotland) Act 1968 are associated with cash assistance, they are much more significant in representing the development of social work from at best preventive work to a more determined promotional stance. Chapter 3 then sets the cash assistance powers of Section 12 within this broader promotional context and traces the process by which the capacity to use them for promotional purposes was increasingly jeopardised by the emphasis on their value in emergencies. Chapter 4, gives the findings of two sets of questionnaires on how Section 12 has been used by the Scottish Social Work Departments. Chapter 5 illustrates the administrative complexities involved for Social Work Departments in dealing with clients' financial problems and deals with the issue of social control, while Chapter 6 analyses the extent to which the provision of cash assistance by social workers has become entangled with the income maintenance functions of the Supplementary Benefits Commission. Chapters 7, 8 and 9 examine in turn the influence on expenditure under Section 12 of Social Work Departments' own policies and procedures in relation to cash assistance, other organisations' policies and procedures, and the views of social workers on the place of cash assistance in social work. Finally, the conclusion discusses the need for greater agreement about the value and purpose of cash assistance and makes recommendations about the sort of Departmertal procedures required for a fair and equitable distribution of cash assistance.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.642549  DOI: Not available
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