Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.641965
Title: Adolescent-parent attachment : emotion regulation and interpersonal competence in adolescence : a study of a psychiatric and a non-clinical population
Author: Brodie, C. S.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2005
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Abstract:
This cross-sectional, comparative study aimed to investigate whether styles of coping help to explain the association between parent-adolescent relationships and adolescents’ social functioning with peers. A non-clinical sample (N=181), consisting of young people aged 11 to 18 years old, was recruited from secondary schools in Edinburgh. A comparative clinical sample (N=19), consisting of young people aged 14 to 18, was recruited from the Young People’s Unit, Royal Edinburgh Hospital. All participants completed questionnaires on attainment to mother, father and friends, behavioural coping styles, interpersonal competence, depression and anxiety. Demographic questions regarding age, gender and parental marital status were also completed by participants. There was no difference between the clinical and non-clinical groups in terms of attachment to mother but the clinical group rated their attachment to furthers more negatively than the non-clinical group. The clinical group reported to use solve the problem style of coping less, and non-productive coping more, than the non-clinical group. There was no difference between the two groups in reported use of reference to others style of coping. The clinical group rated themselves lower in interpersonal competence than the non-clinical group. As expected, the clinical group scored higher on both depression and the anxiety. Detailed analysis of the non-clinical sample revealed that there was an association between attachment to parents and interpersonal competence. Attachment to parents was also related to solve the problem style of coping and solve the problem style of coping was associated with interpersonal competence. Solve the problems style of coping was tested as a possible mediating factor between attachment to parents and interpersonal competence. A partial correlation controlling for solve the problem style of coping reduced the association between attachment to parents and interpersonal competence to a weaker, though still significant, correlation. Multiple regression analyses suggested that attachment to parents did not help to explain the variance in interpersonal competence over and above solve the problem style of coping. The goodness of fit of the hypothesized mediation model was tested using AMOS program for structural equation modelling. Overall, the model fitted the data set well. Implications and limitations of the study and directions for future research are discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psych.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.641965  DOI: Not available
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