Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.641958
Title: Development of methodologies for soil metal bioaccessibility and human health risk
Author: Broadway, Andrew
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2008
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Abstract:
Between 1830 and 1968 Glasgow was home to one of the world’s largest producers of Cr-based chemicals. Chromite ore processing residue (COPR) arising from the factory was used as infill material across large areas of SE Glasgow, resulting in widespread land contamination with Cr(VI), a known human carcinogen of significant mobility. This thesis presents the results of a research project into the bioaccessibility of Cr in Glasgow soils, using a physiologically based extraction test (PBET). 27 Samples were analysed, four of which had a Cr concentration above the residential SGV (200 mg/kg). Two samples where identified with a sizeable Cr(VI) concentration, 1485 ± 24 and 171 ± 5 mg/kg, respectively. Bioaccessible Cr was significantly less than the total concentration, being an average 5% of the total concentration. One sample had a notably high Cr bioaccessibility, at 1156 ± 32 mg/kg. This sample, from Rutherglen, was the only one to exceed assessment criteria, and as such pose a potential risk to human health. The solid phase distribution was also assessed, making it possible to identify the likely mineral sources of bioaccessible Cr within a sample. In the majority of samples Cr was associated with Fe oxide phases, resulting in a low bioaccessibility. Two samples had a sizeable amount of Cr associated with clay and carbonate phases, which have less acid stability, resulting in a higher bioaccessibility (1156 ± 32 and 116 ± 2 mg/kg). A carbonate phase, unique to samples from sites with known history of COPR disposal, was also identified. This had a large amount of associated Cr, suggesting it was derived from the COPR.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.641958  DOI: Not available
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