Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.641359
Title: An archaeological assessment of the prehistoric and protohistoric evidence from the island of Korčula, Croatia
Author: Bass, Bryon
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1997
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Abstract:
This thesis explores various aspects of the archaeological evidence found on the island of Korčula, Croatia, and its nearby islets. The specific geographic nature of the island allows for a defined and critical analysis of past occupations. While the overall temporal occupations on Korčula fall within known regional sequences, the nature of many aspects of the island's archaeological records seems to be unique. These features permit investigations into the nature of settlement patterns and resource exploitations along the Dalmatian Coast. In this regard, Korčula is an ideal case study for regional socio-cultural and economic organization. The research focuses on the prehistoric and protohistoric periods. The prehistoric period ranges from the Mesolithic through to the Iron Age. The protohistoric period is generally assigned to the Iron Age Illyrian occupations, which are primarily associated with Late Archaic Greek evidence. The data for the thesis has been gathered and examined through numerous methods. A bibliographic review establishes the background to the island as well as the Dalmatian Coast region. The primary archaeological field sampling techniques applied include systematic landscape survey, test excavations, and artifact surface collections. A comprehensive computer data base was designed along with a museum documentation system and a bilingual sites and monuments registry. Numerous specialized examinations (pedological profiles, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction of clay source materials and pottery) have also been conducted to gain further insight into the nature of the archaeological record, with an emphasis on the potential for future research applications.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.641359  DOI: Not available
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