Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.640977
Title: Limb health in pigs : the prevalence and risk factors for lameness, limb lesions and claw lesions in pigs, and the influence of gilt nutrition on indicators of limb health
Author: Quinn, Amy Jean
ISNI:       0000 0004 5349 7356
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
This thesis examined the prevalence and risk factors for lameness, limb lesions and claw lesions in pigs, and the influence of gilt nutrition on indicators of limb health through a cross-sectional survey and two cohort studies. A cross-sectional survey of 68 integrated pig farms in Ireland on lameness, limb and claw lesions of 2948 piglets, 3368 weaners, 544 lactating sows, 1289 finishers, 525 replacement gilts, 518 pregnant gilts and 604 pregnant sows was conducted. The prevalence of foot lesions, limb lesions and lameness was determined for each appropriate group and data relating to environmental and management parameters were also collected to identify risk factors. There was a high prevalence of lameness in finishers, gilts and sows. Lameness prevalence is higher in group gestation housing systems than in gestation stalls. Slat void width and the frequency of pen washing increased the risk of lameness in finisher pigs. Floor type, particularly the floor material used influenced both limb and foot lesions. Two cohort studies were conducted to investigate the effect of three dietary regimes for replacement gilts on lameness, areal bone mineral density (aBMD), behaviour, limb, claw and joint lesions and carcass traits. In the first, a diet specifically formulated for developing gilts and fed restrictively from 70kg until 2 weeks before the gilts approximate weight at first service, reduced lameness, joint lesion prevalence and claw unevenness when compared to the two most commonly practiced feeding regimes for developing gilts. In the second, a diet specifically formulated for developing gilts fed ad-libitum from 65 kg reduced lameness and increased aBMD when compared to the two most commonly practiced feeding regimes for developing gilts. In conclusion, this study provides valuable information on lameness, foot and limb lesion prevalence and risk factors as well as providing information on nutritional strategies that could help to address the current high levels of lameness in replacement gilts.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Teagasc (Organization)
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.640977  DOI: Not available
Keywords: SF Animal culture
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