Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.640501
Title: A qualitative analysis of the impact of parental acquired brain injury on parenting and parent child relationships
Author: Anderson, Isabella C.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2006
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Please try the link below.
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
While previous research has demonstrated that acquired brain injury (ABI) exerts a substantial impact on the wider family system, little is known about the impact of parental brain injury on families with dependant children. The present study, therefore, examined the impact of parental ABI on parenting and parent-child relationships. As ABI is assumed to impact upon the entire family system the impact on the parenting of both the injured and non-injured parent was investigated. Semi- structured interviews were conducted with 10 non-injured parents whose partners had sustained an ABI in the last six years. The resultant data were analysed according to grounded theory procedures. A core category labelled ‘being the super-ordinate parent’ emerged. This encapsulated non-injured parents’ experiences of a shift in their and their partner’s parenting roles, relationships and expectations as injured parents were described as struggling to meet the demands of former parental role and non-injured parents appeared to adopt the roles and expectations no longer filled by their partner. Analysis also revealed that for many participants the transition to the role super-ordinate parent was not permanent, as their partners recovered at least some aspects of their previous parental role over time. The findings indicate, nevertheless, that acquired brain injury exerts a substantial impact on the parenting of both injured and non-injured parents, and professionals should consider the needs of the wider family when developing services of this population.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.640501  DOI: Not available
Share: