Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.639580
Title: Minding the baby : the challenges of implementing a reflective functioning programme with high-risk families
Author: Grayton, L.
ISNI:       0000 0004 5364 4037
Awarding Body: UCL (University College London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
Part 1: Literature Review: This section consists of a meta-analytic review examining the efficacy of video-feedback interventions aimed at promoting parental sensitivity and infant attachment. Outcomes from 18 RCTs contributing 20 intervention effects were examined. Results indicated that video-feedback interventions are efficacious in promoting parental sensitivity, infant attachment security and preventing infant attachment disorganisation. These findings suggest that video-feedback interventions may offer exciting potential for clinical practice. Part 2: Empirical Paper: The empirical paper reports on a qualitative study examining the challenges of implementing ‘Minding the Baby’ (MTB), a preventative parenting programme developed explicitly to promote secure parent-child attachment relationships. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 practitioners delivering the programme. Transcripts were analysed thematically and themes were organised into two domains relating to the challenges of implementation and the components of MTB which practitioners identified as being crucial in engaging mothers in reflective work. Results highlight the importance of designing and delivering services which support mentalisation throughout. In addition, a strong therapeutic relationship was identified to be crucial in engaging mothers in reflective work and in responding to the challenges of implementing a mentalisation-based parenting intervention. The study was conducted in collaboration with another UCL Clinical Psychology doctoral student, whose thesis examines parents’ experiences of the therapeutic process in MTB (Burns, 2014).
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.639580  DOI: Not available
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