Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.639187
Title: The effects of fire and different logging practices on nutrient losses in overland flow from eucalyptus and pine forests, northern Portugal
Author: Thomas, A. D.
Awarding Body: University College of Swansea
Current Institution: Swansea University
Date of Award: 1995
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Abstract:
This thesis presents data on nutrient losses in overland flow and eroded sediment after fire in Eucalyptus globulus and Pinus pinaster forests on schist bedrock in the Águeda Basin, northern Portugal. The principal aims were: i) to determine the effects of fire on nutrients in overland flow and eroded sediment during the immediate post-fire period, ii) to evaluate the effects of various post-fire logging techniques on nutrient losses, and iii) to examine the causes of temporal and spatial variability in overland flow and eroded sediment nutrient losses. A total of 11, 8 x 2m bounded plots were used to quantify overland flow, soil and nutrient losses from slopes under burnt and unburnt eucalyptus and pine stands. The plots were monitored for an initial period of 8 months before treatments were applied to simulate the effects of different logging techniques. The results show that fire has a substantial impact on nutrient losses. The main findings of the research are: i) overland flow responses at the burnt sites were significantly greater than at the unburnt sites and the high responses were sustained for at least 2 and 3 years at the eucalyptus and pine sites respectively, ii) solute losses in overland flow were negligible at the unburnt sites but increased substantially at the burnt sites because of increased overland flow and availability of nutrients at the soil surface, iii) nutrient losses in eroded sediment were also greater from the burnt sites because of greater erosion and enrichment of the eroded material, iv) post-fire logging techniques resulting in large amounts of litter debris on the slopes in eucalyptus plantations and delayed logging of scorched pine trees to allow needlefall were found to be effective at reducing eroded sediment nutrient losses. The implications of fire-enhanced nutrient losses on soil fertility and forest productivity are discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.639187  DOI: Not available
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